How are wooden watches made?

Wooden watches have become increasingly popular in recent years for their unique, natural look and eco-friendly properties. They are original gifts to offer and unique timepieces to add to your collection if you are a collector of watches. But have you ever wondered how wooden watches are made? In this blog post, we will take a closer look at the process of creating a wooden watch from start to finish.

The first step in creating a wooden watch is selecting the wood. Many different types of wood are used in wooden watchmaking, very similar to furniture. For wooden watches, FSC-certified wood is typically used to ensure that the wood has been responsibly sourced and harvested in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible. This can help to protect forests and the communities and wildlife that depend on them, as well as ensuring that the wood products are legally and sustainably sourced.

The wood, unsurprisingly the most important part of the watch, is carefully selected for its color, grain, and durability to ensure that the finished product is of the highest quality. Although we have our personal favorite wood types, popular choices for wooden watches typically include maple wood, olive wood, zebrawood, acacia, black or red sandalwood and bamboo. Each wood has its native region around the world and is known for specific characteristics. For example, Maple wood is commonly found in North America and is known for its light color and tight grain pattern. Olive wood typically originates from the Mediterranean region and is known for its durability, intricate grain patterns, and warm, reddish-brown color. Red rosewood is native to Central and South America, as well as some parts of Africa, and is known for its deep, rich color and durability. Keep in mind however that each type of wood can also also be grown and harvested in different regions around the world, depending on the demand and the capability of the location to grow them sustainably.

Once the wood has been selected and sourced, the second step is to shape it into the various components that make up a watch, including the watch case, bezel and strap. The wood is cut to precise measurements using specialized machinery and tools to ensure that each piece is rightly shaped and sized. Wooden watches, like conventional watches, come in various case shapes and sizes depending on the preferred style of customers. Some of the larger wooden watches on the market have a case diameter of around 43mm and the smallest 36mm. It’s a matter of taste and wrist size. Once all of the wooden pieces are cut, the next step is to sand and finish the wooden components. This is done to smooth out any rough edges and to bring out the natural beauty of the wood. Sanding is done by hand using progressively finer grits of sandpaper, and then finished with natural oils, such as tung oil or linseed oil. This last process is of critical importance. Wooden watches are purchased for their originality and the quality of the finish is important for the natural grain of the wood to stand out.

Once the wooden components are sanded and finished, the watch is then assembled. The watch movement, which includes the battery and the mechanism that powers the watch, is inserted into the wooden case. Most watch movements are produced either in Switzerland or Japan, with both countries having a long history of watchmaking and precision engineering to develop sophisticated technologies to produce accurate and durable watch movements. Once the movement has been inserted, the watch face is then attached to the case and the hands are added. This step requires precision, patience and is also an important part of the watch making process. The next step is then to assemble the watch strap (assuming it is made of wood as well as there are some models that come with a leather strap) by carefully connecting each strap link to one another using thin screws, a very similar process and structure to steel links in a conventional watch. Each thin screw must be carefully inserted so that it can potentially be removed later on by customers who want to adjust the size of their strap to fit their wrist.

Finally, the watch is inspected for quality control. Quality control is an essential aspect of watchmaking, as it ensures that each watch produced meets the highest standards of accuracy, durability, and craftsmanship.This includes chronometer or time testing the accuracy of a watch movement, durability testing to ensure that they can withstand shocks, vibration, and extreme temperatures. Each watch is inspected at various stages of production to ensure that all components are assembled correctly, and that the watch is functioning properly.

To conclude, wooden watches are made from start to finish with precision, attention to detail and using traditional hand craftsmanship. The creation process is not limited to one country, with the wood coming from one region, the movement coming from another and the carving process in (yet again) another. The natural beauty and eco-friendly properties of wood make wooden watches a great choice for those who want a unique and sustainable accessory, or who want to offer a unique gift. The process of making a wooden watch is complex and labor-intensive, but the end result is a beautiful and unique timepiece that will last for years to come.

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Free delivery

throughout Europe

2 trees planted

for every watch purchased

2 years warranty

high-quality product

Satisfied customers

Read their stories